Katherine Lau Publishes Peer-Reviewed Research Article

Katherine Lau of the Psychology Department published a research article with collaborators in the Department of Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. The paper is entitled “Race/ethnicity, and behavioral health status: First arrest and outcomes in a large sample of juvenile offenders” and was just recently published in the peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research. The reference and abstract are provided below.

Lau, K. S. L., Rosenman, M. B., Wiehe, S. E., Tu, W., & Aalsma, M. C. (2017). Race/ethnicity, and behavioral health status: First arrest and outcomes in a large sample of juvenile offenders. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 1-14. doi: 10.1007/s11414-017-9578-3

The objective of this study was to assess the simultaneous effects of gender, race/ethnicity, and pre-arrest behavioral health (BH) service-use on age at first arrest, and first arrest outcomes. Between January 2004 and December 2011, arrest and medical records were collected on a retrospective longitudinal cohort of 12,476 first-time offenders, ages 8-18 years. Black youth were arrested at younger ages than white or Hispanic youth. Youth with psychiatric problems were arrested at younger ages than youth with substance-use, dual-diagnoses, or no BH problems. Compared to white males, black males had lower odds of detention and BH referrals. Compared to white females, black females had higher odds of release and lower odds of probation, detention, and BH referrals. A significant gender-by-BH problem interaction revealed males and females with previous psychiatric problems were arrested at younger ages than youth with substance, dual-diagnosis, or no prior problems. Implications are discussed.