SURC to Replace SRCA Day for 2018

PLEASE NOTE AND MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR SURC AND RELATED DEADLINES. There will be no Student Research & Creative Activity (SRCA) Day in spring 2018. Rather, our campus will be hosting the SUNY Undergraduate Research Conference (SURC) on Friday, April 20, 2018. SURC is an annual, multidisciplinary event that brings together hundreds of undergraduate students and faculty mentors from across the SUNY system for a full day of activities, including student presentations (poster sessions, oral presentations, performances, readings, etc.).

We are hoping for high representation of our own SUNY Oneonta scholar presenters at SURC. Please note, however, that the abstract submission deadline will be February 19 (earlier than our usual SRCA Day abstract deadline, and a FIRM deadline). The abstract submission portal will open soon; so, check the SURC @ Oneonta website often for this and other updates.

Katherine Lau Publishes Peer-Reviewed Research Article

Katherine Lau of the Psychology Department published a research article with collaborators in the Department of Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. The paper is entitled “Race/ethnicity, and behavioral health status: First arrest and outcomes in a large sample of juvenile offenders” and was just recently published in the peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research. The reference and abstract are provided below.

Lau, K. S. L., Rosenman, M. B., Wiehe, S. E., Tu, W., & Aalsma, M. C. (2017). Race/ethnicity, and behavioral health status: First arrest and outcomes in a large sample of juvenile offenders. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 1-14. doi: 10.1007/s11414-017-9578-3

The objective of this study was to assess the simultaneous effects of gender, race/ethnicity, and pre-arrest behavioral health (BH) service-use on age at first arrest, and first arrest outcomes. Between January 2004 and December 2011, arrest and medical records were collected on a retrospective longitudinal cohort of 12,476 first-time offenders, ages 8-18 years. Black youth were arrested at younger ages than white or Hispanic youth. Youth with psychiatric problems were arrested at younger ages than youth with substance-use, dual-diagnoses, or no BH problems. Compared to white males, black males had lower odds of detention and BH referrals. Compared to white females, black females had higher odds of release and lower odds of probation, detention, and BH referrals. A significant gender-by-BH problem interaction revealed males and females with previous psychiatric problems were arrested at younger ages than youth with substance, dual-diagnosis, or no prior problems. Implications are discussed.