Tami LaPilusa Presents and Chairs Session at 3rd Bahamas History Conference

Tami LaPilusa (Lecturer, Biology Department; School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences; G’12) presented a research talk co-authored with Kayla Earls (U’15), two posters co-authored with current SUNY Oneonta Undergraduates, and chaired a session on crabs at the 3rd Bahamas National History Conference (March 14-18, 2016) in Nassau City on New Providence Island in The Bahamas. LaPilusa and Earls’ oral presentation was titled “Crab pen survey and harvest analysis of the land crab, Cardisoma guanhumi Latrielle (Decapoda: Gecarcinidae), fishery in The Bahamas”. Taylor Harper (undergraduate, Biology major, PreVet concentration) was co-author for the poster entitled “Impacts of Reptile Trade on Conservation Efforts and Animal Welfare”. The second poster entitled “Current Status of Management Regulations for the Land Crab (Cardisoma guanhumi) Fishery in the Caribbean, Central, & South American Regions” was co-authored by Taylor Waldrop (undergraduate, Biology major).

Preconference excursions included a tour of the Pompey Museum of Slavery & Emancipation (http://www.ammcbahamas.com/Runtime/PompeyMuseum.aspx) , a birding expedition to several of the National Parks of The Bahamas (http://www.bnt.bs/_m1731/The-National-Parks-of-The-Bahamas) and Clifton Heritage National Park (http://www.cliftonheritage.org/) on New Providence Island. Postconference expeditions included a behind the scenes tour of Ardastra Gardens, Zoo and Conservation Centre (http://www.ardastra.com/).

Undergraduate student researchers Taylor Harper and Taylor Waldrop also presented talks following their international conference experience to the SUNY Oneonta Retired Faculty and Staff April 12th Luncheon and presented their posters at the 2016 Student Research and Creativity Activity Day on April 20, 2016.

Faculty support to attend the international conference was partially supported by a UUP IDA to Tami LaPilusa. Student attendance at the international conference was made by possible in part by grants from the D’Antonio Travel for Excellence Fund and the Student Travel for Excellence Program (STEP) awarded to Taylor Harper and Taylor Waldrop.